Tröstlicher Lieb stets ich mich üb

 Tröstlicher Lieb stets ich mich üb
Lieder und Tänze der Renaissance
Intavolaturen und Originalsätze für 2 Lauten, Cembalo, Orgel, Flötenquartett
Cornetto COR 10051. 46’09

This very short (46’09) CD of Songs and Dances from the Renaissance focusses on the practice of intabulating (transcribing) vocal pieces for instruments, a common practice in the 15th and 16th-centuries. In many examples, the addition of divisions (additional notes added to the original slow-moving vocal lines) gave more of a musical flow to pieces. Many early organ and keyboard treatises are based on the practice of adding divisions to intabulations, making it, arguably, the foundation of all later keyboard music.  Continue reading

German Renaissance Organ Music c1460-1577. Programme notes

The Queen’s College Chapel, Oxford.  25 November 2015
German Renaissance Organ Music  c1460-1577

Andrew Benson-Wilson

Conrad Paumann (c1410-1473) Gloria de Sancta Maria Vergine
Paul Hofhaimer (1459-1537)      Salve Regina  5v.
Hans Buchner (1483-1538)         Gloria patri in la quarto toni
Hans Kotter (c1485-1541)           Kochersperger Spanieler
Arnolt Schlick (c1460-c1521)    Da pacem
Bernhard Schmid I (1535-92)    Ein gutter Wein ist lobenswerdt    –    Sicut mater consolatur

Queen's photo.jpgThe start of the Renaissance is difficult to define. In organ music, around 1450 seems a reasonable date, with music from the likes of the Buxheimer Orgelbüch and the Faenza Codex combining elements of Medieval and Renaissance styles. By this stage, the organ had a fully chromatic keyboard, sometimes more than one manual, and independent stops were beginning to be separated out from the Medieval ‘Blockwerk’ – the equivalent of single mixture where one note plays a chorus of ten or more notes.

The first piece demonstrates this transitional phase. Continue reading